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Complex Problem Solving

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  1. Day 1 : Problems
    3 Sessions
    |
    2 To Dos
  2. Day 2 : Helping tools
    2 Sessions
    |
    1 To Do
  3. Day 3 : Finding the right problem
    3 Sessions
  4. Day 4 : Prioritize
    3 Sessions
    |
    1 To Do
  5. Day 5 : Approaching problems
    3 Sessions
  6. Day 6 : Research
    3 Sessions
  7. Day 7 : Framing the problem
    2 Sessions
  8. Day 8 : Identifying root causes
    3 Sessions
  9. Day 9 : Categorizing your problem
  10. Day 10 : Problem Solving Styles
    4 Sessions
  11. Day 11 : Mid-course assimilation & feed back
  12. Day 12 : Assumptions and Constraints
    3 Sessions
  13. Day 13 : Assumptions explained with examples
    2 Sessions
    |
    1 To Do
  14. Day 14 : Using multiple perspectives
    4 Sessions
  15. Day 15 : Evaluating Solutions
    3 Sessions
  16. Day 16 : Evaluate risks
    2 Sessions
  17. Day 17: Presenting your solution
    3 Sessions
  18. Day 18 : Using criticism
    2 Sessions
  19. Day 19 : Implement the solution
    6 Sessions
  20. Day 20 : Problem solving mindset
    3 Sessions
  21. Day 21 : It's not the End, but a new Beginning
    1 Session
    |
    1 To Do
Lesson Progress
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Ancient Greek epics typically start in medias res, in the middle of things, and later go on to fill out preceding and succeeding action. You can do this in problem solving. It’s, again, sort of the “ready, fire, aim” approach.

Movies are put together this way all the time. The “obvious” order is

idea—script—producer—actors—studio—filming

but many movies get actors first, then a producer, then a script, etc.

For our example: we can say the middle approach is starting at the point you are right now and trying to use a trial and an error method to improve the team’s performance.

How good is your Lead Generation process?
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